Native thai people

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Thailand has a fascinating history, particularly because over many centuries Thailand has adopted many cultural influences from surrounding regions. But while the influential dynasties of kings and queens, the shifting geographical boundaries and religious influences — all of which have resulted in the unique Thainess we know today — are very interesting, one unanswered historical question remains the most fascinating aspect of Thailand:.

Now, a of people reading this post may think they know the answer — people usually cite a version of the South China theory. But the fact is that the complexity of the origins of the Thai cannot be encompassed by a simple, straightforward explanation. However, what I can do is try to make sense of the dense historical and ethnological background of the people of Thailand, and give you all the information you need to come to your own conclusion on what seems most plausible, according to the evidence. The country is home to 75 percent Thai, 14 percent ethnic Chinese, four percent Malay Muslims, one percent Khmer Cambodianone percent Kui, one percent Karen, and.

Thai-Isan people are often considered culturally distinct from those found in central Thailand, some considering them closer to the people of Lao. Native thai people is an over generalisation, though, and has more to do with geographical proximity than descent. There are many people originally from Central or Southern Thailand living in Northeast Thailand, who speak the regional dialect. Indeed, there are parts of Northeast Thailand where other languages are spoken by minorities, such as Khmer by the Northern Khmer Thai-Khmer.

While people may be considered of Lao or Cambodian descent, they are still part of the Tai group, which we'll get into in a moment. There are also notable ethnic Thai-Chinese communities living throughout Thailand, including the Northeast, but particularly in the South. However, we know that the majority of Thai-Chinese established themselves in Thailand over three waves of migration, dating back to the 13th Century:. Slightly more than half of the ethnic Chinese population in Thailand trace their ancestry to eastern Guangdong Province. This is evidenced by the prevalence of the Minnan Chaozhou dialect among the Chinese in Thailand.

A minority trace their ancestry Native thai people Hakka and Hainanese immigrants. Moreover, if we look at Thailand as a whole, we see there are many cultural distinctions in different areas of the country. For example, parts of the the South have a deep-rooted Malay influence, and in the North we see a mix of numerous tribes, many of whom have descended from neighbouring countries along the foothills of the Himalayas. So rather than trying to generalise where a particular group of people in a particular area of Thailand have descended from originallywe are trying to identify a common heritage between those whose families have lived in Thailand, and indeed the immediate surrounding region, for many centuries.

And interestingly, as you'll note in the next section, the history explains how these different sub-groups are tied together. Genetically, Thai people descend from the Tai ethnolinguistic group speakers of a common Tai language who are also found in other Southeast Asian countries and in China.

As the Tai group spread, so did their language, becoming the mother-tongue of both Thailand and Laos.

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As the group settled in different regions Native thai people the country and started communities, the ethnic subgroups of modern-day Thailand were created. Most of the groups populate central and southern Thailand, due to their original settlement near the Chao Phraya River, which winds its way through modern-day Bangkok. The supposition above may provoke controversy, depending on what you believe about the origin of Thai people.

The Mongolians origin theory was initiated by Native thai people missionary W. Dodd, who made Thailand his home for 32 years. Though both are interesting theories, modern-day scholars have debunked them, noting that neither the Mung nor the Tai could have survived a crossing of the unforgiving Gobi desert. In addition, the Tai culture was known for its extensive knowledge of agriculture and cultivation. It seems unlikely that such a civilization would suddenly become nomadic. This theory got its start with linguist Terrien de La Couperie, a Frenchman who had been tasked with the study of ancient Chinese records.

After studying the complex linguistic patterns of both China and Thai, La Couperie concluded that the Tai people originated in central China, pointing to the uncanny similarities in language between the Mung people who represented an ethnic minority in their home province of Szechuan and the Tai people who later populated Southeast Asia. Critics have pointed out that the document La Couperie studied is a replication — not an original — and its information has not been verified, largely debunking his theory in academic circles.

Later, Thai Prince Damrong corroborated this theory but suggested that the Tai people settled in the area between China and Tibet in 44 B. Once in Yunnan, the groups separated into separate tribes. In the s, Thai theorist Phraya Anuman Raja-Thon suggested that the Tai people originated in central China, as well, but this time in the Yangtze basin, migrating from Szechuan to the east.

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Though this theory has been explored extensively, anthropologists point to key physical, lifestyle and cultural differences between central Chinese populations and modern-day descendants of the Tai people. Inan English explorer named A. After exploring Southeast Asia from Burma to India, he proposed that a similar lifestyle and language between the regions made the connection between the two groups likely, if not certain.

Adapting this theory, a German anthropologist named Wolfram Eberhard concluded that the Tai originated in Kwangtung, but eventually migrated through Yunnan to Vietnam, founding the Tan Kingdom and then the Nan Xiao. This theory has been discussed at length, and while some sociologists and anthropologists still believe that the South China Origins Theory holds true, it is still hotly debated. Benedict then predicted that a group Mon-Khmer pushed the Tai into southern China nearly 4, years ago, but that they later migrated back into Burma, Northern Thailand, Laos, and Northern Vietnam between and 1, years ago.

Researcher H. Quaritch Wales attempted to prove that the Tai people had originated in Thailand itself by using skulls he found and studied in Kanchanaburi Province, which dated back to 50 A. He compared them to modern-day Thai skulls and concluded that the two were extremely similar, theorizing that the Tai people had occupied Thailand for the past two millennia.

This idea was corroborated by Sud San-Vichien, a physiologist who compared ancient bones from Kanchanaburi and Rajaburi provinces with bones from modern-day ethnic Thais, concluding that they were virtually identical. He, too, concluded that modern-day Thailand was the original home of the Tai ethnolinguistic group. To corroborate, archaeologists and anthropologists have found evidence of continuity in culture, tradition, physiology, and civilization.

A researcher named Somsak Punta-Sombun determined this after exploring the interwoven relationship of genetics and blood type. He found that ethnic Thai and Chinese people have dissimilar genetics and that there was a much closer relationship between Thai and Javanese civilizations. He even pd that the Tai group may have lived in Java. Additionally, famed Thai anthropologist and physician, Pravej Vasi, found Native thai people blood levels of Hemoglobin E in populations living in Southeast Asia, and in the Tai, Khmer, and Mon civilizations, but he did not find any of the blood markers in Chinese populations.

These findings throw a wrench in China-centric theories, and lend credibility to the Malay-Indonesian theory. The Thai origin story may have actually been the complete opposite, with hominids expanding into China Native thai people Indonesia from what we Native thai people know as Northern Thailand.

In addition, the finding in Lampang would predate the Ban Chiang Archaeological Sitewhich is pd by many to be the oldest and most ificant prehistoric settlement in Southeast Asia and a landmark that many use to explain important information about the life of the earliest Tai settlers.

While information about the origin of the Tai ethnolinguistic group is still developing, these six theories paint an interesting picture of migration patterns within China and Southeast Asia thousands of years ago. Whether Thailand acted as the cradle of the Tai civilization or whether it became a ificant migration site for groups originating in either Indochina, Java, or mainland China, it's a country defined by the rich diversity it mothers and the cultural legacy of its people.

Having studied all the theories, the only thing I can really conclude is that the origin of the Thai simply depends on how far you are able to go back through history; though I find it incredibly interesting that hominids may have first settled in what we now know as Thailand prior to migrating to China. Is it possible that the majority of Thai, Laos, Khmer and Burmese people are linked to these early hominid settlers?

Is it possible that they migrated to China, settled there and spread out and created different communities, and then began migrating back into what we now know as Thailand, Lao, Cambodia, and Mayamar, and possibly Malaysia and Indonesia? I have tried to be as accurate as possible in my representation of each one of these theories. If you spot an error or feel there is a misrepresentation, or you have anything else to add to the debate on where Thai people originate, I'd be grateful if you can leave in the comments section below.

It would be fantastic to hear from any anthropologists or historians who know far more about this subject than I do. Jun 19, at am. Jun 19, at pm. Jan 07, at pm. Jun 20, at am. Jul 03, at pm. Jul 30, at pm. Oct 09, at am. Jun 28, at pm. May 20, at am. Dec 13, at pm. Jun 22, at am. May 05, at pm. Jul 18, at pm. Jul 19, at pm. Apr 07, at pm. Oct 05, at am. Oct 05, at pm.

May 10, at am.

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May 10, at pm. Sep 26, at am. Oct 14, at pm. Aug 22, at am. Aug 22, at pm. Notify me when new comments are added. This has happened through immigration and migration, and through war over territory. But while the influential dynasties of kings and queens, the shifting geographical boundaries and religious influences — all of which have resulted in the unique Thainess we know today — are very interesting, one unanswered historical question remains the most fascinating aspect of Thailand: From where do Thai people originate?

In fact, there are multiple theories six, to be precise on where the Thai originated. I'd love to give you a definitive answer in this post, but that would be impossible. There are roughly 20 million Lao-speaking-Lao-Isan people who live in northeast Thailand. However, we know that the majority of Thai-Chinese established themselves in Thailand over three waves of migration, dating back to the 13th Century: Slightly more than half of the ethnic Chinese population in Thailand trace their ancestry to eastern Guangdong Province.

Native thai people these people are linked, or so it is thought, according to some theories. The Tai Genetically, Thai people descend from the Tai ethnolinguistic group speakers of a common Tai language who are also found in other Southeast Asian countries and in China.

Origin Theories The supposition above may provoke controversy, depending on what you believe about the origin of Thai people. Though his idea was certainly unique, Dodd offered little proof that this theory was correct. This theory has been largely discredited in Southeast Asia. But Wait!

Native thai people

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Ethnic groups in Thailand